Nurses: they’ve been saving lives, taking pulses and caring for others since the beginning of time. Honor the hard work and dedication of the Florence Nightingales in your life by wishing them a happy Nurses Day on May 6 or anytime during National Nurse Week, May 6-12.  Nurses Day raises awareness of the important role nurses have in everyone’s life. From Nurse Midwives to Nurse Practitioners to Registered Nurses, show those superheroes in scrubs just how appreciated they are with Nurses Day cards that celebrate their career or thank them for their care. Want to know just what to write in it? We’ll help you say it in just the right way. And gifts for nurses are always appreciated, especially gifts that make their job just a little bit easier—like a travel mug, soothing hand cream or a fancy pen.  A wood quote sign or figurine about nursing also makes a great nursing graduation gift. Be sure to give your nursing appreciation gift the right finishing touch with our selection of gift wrap perfect for the occasion. Want to know more? Check out our article on the history of Nurses Day, then go out and tell all the nurses you know: they’re the balm!
A funny Nurse Manager gag gift or birthday gift for a Nurse Manager. This traditional 11 ounce white ceramic coffee mug is perfect for any hot beverage. Wide mouth and large C-handle allow for easy, every day use. Whether drinking your morning coffee at work, or sipping on a hot cup of tea at home, this mug is up to the task. Microwave and dishwasher safe for your convenience. All designs are lead free. ">
Sentimental retirement gifts. Scrapbooks, photo albums and collections of notes from customers, clients or colleagues are often the most meaningful retirement gifts. While sentimental gifts take some effort to compile, they are likely to be cherished by the retiree. "Gift recipients of all kinds love sentimental gifts, ones that remind them of the gift giver and the relationship the gift giver has with the recipient," says Jeff Galak, an associate professor of marketing at Carnegie Mellon University's Tepper School of Business in Pittsburgh. "Givers should focus on gifts that exemplify the relationship they had and will hopefully continue to have with the person who is retiring. Research shows that this will not only be well liked by the recipient, but could also strengthen the relationship between gift giver and gift recipient."
What you’ll get: A collection of true stories told by different nurses in practice. The stories are in a narrative form and often feature “first” moments in practicing the nursing profession like first code, first death and many more. Helpful reflections about what keeps these nurses stay in this profession are nice to read especially if you’re doubting the career you chose.
Some people may think gift cards are a “lazy option”, but I think they’re just fabulous. Does your preceptor enjoy reading? What about a magazine subscription? Or better yet…a nursing magazine subscription! Nurses need to stay up-to-date with healthcare trends, and the magazines that are out there now are really enjoyable to read as well as informative. Or, you could get him/her a gift card to the local scrub shop (we always need new scrubs…those things take a beating!). ">
“The deafening sound of a siren hammered the eardrums of the people in the street. An ambulance crossed town at high speed. Two accident victims with broken limbs, multiple contusions, and various other injuries were being transported to the emergency room. A young nurse with an exuberant body and shapely curves was providing very sensual emergency care which made them forget all suffering. Meanwhile, the driver suffered from a slight strabismus though it did not prevent him from swerving dangerously through the hundreds of cars who, at that hour, clogged the roads of the town. He just missed two light poles, grazed 14 cars, hit two motorcyclists and rammed a truck, but his orders were to arrive as fast as possible. The first to be taken to the emergency room was the paramedic who had been sitting next to the driver; he had arrived unconscious with symptoms of cardiac arrest.”
On a nurse’s busiest days they can end up walking miles and miles—give them the gift of being able to track that exercise! In such a demanding career, it can be difficult to factor in time for working out but a wearable device such as FitBit allows you to track how much activity you have actually done during the day. It also tracks your sleep and lets the nurse in your life monitor their own health data and stay motivated with their health.
Sentimental retirement gifts. Scrapbooks, photo albums and collections of notes from customers, clients or colleagues are often the most meaningful retirement gifts. While sentimental gifts take some effort to compile, they are likely to be cherished by the retiree. "Gift recipients of all kinds love sentimental gifts, ones that remind them of the gift giver and the relationship the gift giver has with the recipient," says Jeff Galak, an associate professor of marketing at Carnegie Mellon University's Tepper School of Business in Pittsburgh. "Givers should focus on gifts that exemplify the relationship they had and will hopefully continue to have with the person who is retiring. Research shows that this will not only be well liked by the recipient, but could also strengthen the relationship between gift giver and gift recipient." ">
The symbolic white coat is no longer reserved for physicians! Though historically lab coats have only been worn by physicians, today more and more nurses are embracing high-quality medical lab coats to complete their professional look. With custom name and title embroidery, they can show off their nursing credentials and wear their white coat with pride. Opt for a lab coat made with performance fabrics, which will repel fluids, wick away sweat, and are generally lower-maintenance and have greater durability.
100%  Guarantee - (Exception: embroidered products are not returnable) Items may be returned in original condition for a refund or credit within 15 days of delivery. Shipping charges will be refunded only if the return is our error. All returns must be accompanied by the packing slip and return authorization number by calling 888-815-3455. Returns may take a week to process.

Nurse gift throw blanket that can be personalized with name, date, medical facility or years of service. A keepsake gift for Nurse graduation gift, school nurse gift, registered nurse gift, nurse thank you gift, Nurse's Day and nurse retirement gift. Unique gift for nurse week celebration, achievement, and years of service for those in the medical field.


Hobby retirement gifts. If you know what the retiree plans to do after leaving the workforce, you can tailor your gift to the retiree's hobbies or travel plans. "Subscriptions to publications, or to wine or gourmet food clubs, organization memberships, cultural events, lessons or activities in which the retiree has expressed interest, i.e. becoming more tech-savvy, learning a new language, painting, sculpting – even skydiving or rock climbing," says Rosanne Thomas, president of Protocol Advisors. "The person is retiring from work, not from life. Treat him or her to an exciting new experience." ">

It’s gift-giving season again—although for oncology nurses, managing material expressions of gratitude happens all year long, not just during the holidays. This can be a complex issue for all healthcare providers but especially oncology nurses, who develop a special, unique bond with patients and their families, who often want to show tangible appreciation for their care.
Hi! One of my favorite gifts--for someone I have not already gifted with this--is to make a rice bag. You can take either a nice hand towel, or some inexpensive polar fleece (I usually use the fleece) and sew a square packet, then fill it with rice, and sew it shut. With the fleece, I then take a pair of scissors and fringe the edges for a nice look.
Hobby retirement gifts. If you know what the retiree plans to do after leaving the workforce, you can tailor your gift to the retiree's hobbies or travel plans. "Subscriptions to publications, or to wine or gourmet food clubs, organization memberships, cultural events, lessons or activities in which the retiree has expressed interest, i.e. becoming more tech-savvy, learning a new language, painting, sculpting – even skydiving or rock climbing," says Rosanne Thomas, president of Protocol Advisors. "The person is retiring from work, not from life. Treat him or her to an exciting new experience." ">

Consider championing a proactive approach at your facility to clearly communicate that staff are not allowed to receive monetary gifts or the equivalent. Create a statement—e.g., “It is our policy that staff may not accept gifts of any kind”— that can be shared with new patients in their information packet about the facility, parking, visitors, etc, and suggest alternatives for redirecting gifts.
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