On a nurse’s busiest days they can end up walking miles and miles—give them the gift of being able to track that exercise! In such a demanding career, it can be difficult to factor in time for working out but a wearable device such as FitBit allows you to track how much activity you have actually done during the day. It also tracks your sleep and lets the nurse in your life monitor their own health data and stay motivated with their health.
Experience retirement gifts. Retirees already have a lifetime of accumulated possessions, but almost everyone appreciates a fun new experience. "The research suggests that experiential gifts are better than material gifts," Galak says. "That is, rather than give a gold watch, give a ticket to a concert. Even better would be to give two tickets, and go with the recipient. Not only will the retiree appreciate the experience itself, but they will have a chance to form a stronger bond with the gift giver." ">

For the 2019 Nurses Appreciation Week season, we are proud to offer an expanded line of gift ideas with our all new themes that include "Proud Member of Nurses Nation" and "Nurse: Skill, Strength, Dedication". In addition to useful and heart-warming gifts, we also are offering themed decoration kits, balloons, posters, buttons and lapel pins with gift cards. ">
And we could go on, but you should get the idea. Leading up to the day of her retirement when you can give her a bouquet of twelve red roses. Add a note containing a message, favorite quote, or special words, with each of the gifts, and keep your identity secret until the last day. Alternatively, all her co-workers could take it in turns providing a range of different gifts. One for each day leading up to her last day at work.
When I was in my first year of practice as an oncology clinical nurse specialist (more than 30 years ago), my patient Lin offered me a personal gift. Sure, I had been the recipient of many gifts— flowers, chocolate candies, homemade food—but all had been shared with the entire staff. This situation was different: She was presenting me with a small, hand-embroidered hankie. No note, no verbal thank-you—just a smile and a bow. I had first met Lin about 10 months before, when she was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. She had worked long, hard hours as a housekeeper; had a devoted husband and 2 beautiful boys, both in elementary school; and barely spoke English. I was the nurse who helped her understand her diagnosis, her access device, and her complex 2-year chemotherapy protocol, with all its adverse effects. She had just finished her initial phase of intense treatment and was transitioning to maintenance therapy. ">
100%  Guarantee - (Exception: embroidered products are not returnable) Items may be returned in original condition for a refund or credit within 15 days of delivery. Shipping charges will be refunded only if the return is our error. All returns must be accompanied by the packing slip and return authorization number by calling 888-815-3455. Returns may take a week to process.
National Nurses Week is May 6th-12th, 2018. In 1974, a presidential proclamation was issued to formally recognize a National Nurses Week. In 1993, May 6 to May 12 was established as the permanent date, ending on Florence Nightingale's birthday. Each year the celebration has grown in this country as we rely on these incredible individuals behind quality healthcare: our nurses, nursing assistants and our caring healthcare team and staff! Each day they are on the front lines, caring for our friends, family, and loved ones. Each day they make a difference in the lives of others. ">

When I am searching for a truly unique gift for someone, Etsy is always my first stop. I love the fact that most of the items are handmade and one of a kind. I also feel great about encouraging small local businesses. Etsy has plenty of original gift ideas for the nurse in your life, from drinkware to jewelry. I always get tons of compliments when I wear my Etsy buys.  I know the nurses in your life will too! ">
It’s gift-giving season again—although for oncology nurses, managing material expressions of gratitude happens all year long, not just during the holidays. This can be a complex issue for all healthcare providers but especially oncology nurses, who develop a special, unique bond with patients and their families, who often want to show tangible appreciation for their care.
While her nursing career might not have left much free time for hobbies and other interests, a new retiree will have all the time in the world to cultivate her interests or maybe explore a new hobby. You could create a gift basket filled with hobby related items. For example, say she’s a gardener, fill a watering can with various gardening tools and equipment and throw in a few packets of seeds. If she’s a whizz in the kitchen, then some cookery books, kitchen gadgets, oven gloves, apron, tasty ingredients will be more suitable. And if you know there’s something she’s been dying to learn, then enrol her in some lessons.

In all, Promos On-Time offers the largest selection of theme decorated nurse appreciation gifts as well as over ten thousand promotional gift ideas that can be personalized with your hospital or health center's logo, artwork and sentiments of praise. Choose from low minimum quantity gift ideas or order in bulk and save. Thanking nurses should be a practice throughout the year, but National Nurses Week is a time to unify and let these dedicated professionals know just how much they mean to your organization and the community. Visit our NURSE APPRECIATION IDEA GUIDE for more great tips to celebrate National Nurses Week.

The symbolic white coat is no longer reserved for physicians! Though historically lab coats have only been worn by physicians, today more and more nurses are embracing high-quality medical lab coats to complete their professional look. With custom name and title embroidery, they can show off their nursing credentials and wear their white coat with pride. Opt for a lab coat made with performance fabrics, which will repel fluids, wick away sweat, and are generally lower-maintenance and have greater durability. ">
When I was in my first year of practice as an oncology clinical nurse specialist (more than 30 years ago), my patient Lin offered me a personal gift. Sure, I had been the recipient of many gifts— flowers, chocolate candies, homemade food—but all had been shared with the entire staff. This situation was different: She was presenting me with a small, hand-embroidered hankie. No note, no verbal thank-you—just a smile and a bow. I had first met Lin about 10 months before, when she was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. She had worked long, hard hours as a housekeeper; had a devoted husband and 2 beautiful boys, both in elementary school; and barely spoke English. I was the nurse who helped her understand her diagnosis, her access device, and her complex 2-year chemotherapy protocol, with all its adverse effects. She had just finished her initial phase of intense treatment and was transitioning to maintenance therapy. ">
“The deafening sound of a siren hammered the eardrums of the people in the street. An ambulance crossed town at high speed. Two accident victims with broken limbs, multiple contusions, and various other injuries were being transported to the emergency room. A young nurse with an exuberant body and shapely curves was providing very sensual emergency care which made them forget all suffering. Meanwhile, the driver suffered from a slight strabismus though it did not prevent him from swerving dangerously through the hundreds of cars who, at that hour, clogged the roads of the town. He just missed two light poles, grazed 14 cars, hit two motorcyclists and rammed a truck, but his orders were to arrive as fast as possible. The first to be taken to the emergency room was the paramedic who had been sitting next to the driver; he had arrived unconscious with symptoms of cardiac arrest.” ">
Consider championing a proactive approach at your facility to clearly communicate that staff are not allowed to receive monetary gifts or the equivalent. Create a statement—e.g., “It is our policy that staff may not accept gifts of any kind”— that can be shared with new patients in their information packet about the facility, parking, visitors, etc, and suggest alternatives for redirecting gifts. ">
A heartfelt note. Long after the chocolate has been eaten or the experience has been enjoyed, a retiree might stumble upon the thoughtful card included with the gift. "Present the gift in person with a heartfelt written and verbalized message of thanks for the retiree's dedication, hard work and accomplishments," Thomas says. "It is appreciation and acknowledgment that people want most of all." ">

The bigwigs where she works are sure to be planning to mark the occasion with a medal, plaque, or some other gift that acknowledges her years of service and commitment to the profession. Friends, family and colleagues can take the opportunity to create a more personalized memory of her caring career. A few weeks before her last day speak with as many people as possible and ask them to provide a story, message, poem, drawing or sentimental memento to put in a scrapbook. If there is enough time, you could make some recordings, using a smartphone or camcorder. Interview some of her colleagues, friends, patients, and family and put them all together in a home video. When she misses her life before retirement, there will be a long lasting reminder she can replay.
Whatever you decide to do as a gift ... don't forget to give them a "professional reward" that correlates to the "professional gift" of teaching and mentorship they have given you. They helped support your career, you should support theirs -- by writing a note of thanks and praise and copying it to your manager so that it can be put in their employment file. Such a thank-you note can help them get a good evaluation score, perhaps a promotion, etc. in the future.
Every nurse remembers the excitement and pride he or she felt when first opening that box containing his or her very first stethoscope. The novelty may have worn-off some for your new graduate nurse, but that doesn’t mean that the poor stethoscope need be relegated to floating around at the bottom of a tote bag, getting tangled in everything from your gym socks to your lunch. This lightweight hard case will keep it in pristine condition for years to come!
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