It’s an honor to be a preceptor. I love taking a new nurse, or a student nurse, under my wing and teaching them the ropes of nursing. And while I find great joy in teaching, I also find it incredibly stressful. Not that the new nurse isn’t smart, they are. It’s just a stressful job, and it’s very fast-paced, which means that it’s easy to fall behind and it’s easy to miss something. I have a routine, one I know that works well for me and my patients and keeps me in check throughout the day. If I have to hand over some of the responsibility to a newbie, or slow my pace down to explain something, it’s much easier to overlook something important, or fall behind and have to stay at work charting until 9pm. Not to mention, it’s my license that is on the line.
Consider championing a proactive approach at your facility to clearly communicate that staff are not allowed to receive monetary gifts or the equivalent. Create a statement—e.g., “It is our policy that staff may not accept gifts of any kind”— that can be shared with new patients in their information packet about the facility, parking, visitors, etc, and suggest alternatives for redirecting gifts. ">

Hobby retirement gifts. If you know what the retiree plans to do after leaving the workforce, you can tailor your gift to the retiree's hobbies or travel plans. "Subscriptions to publications, or to wine or gourmet food clubs, organization memberships, cultural events, lessons or activities in which the retiree has expressed interest, i.e. becoming more tech-savvy, learning a new language, painting, sculpting – even skydiving or rock climbing," says Rosanne Thomas, president of Protocol Advisors. "The person is retiring from work, not from life. Treat him or her to an exciting new experience."
Hobby retirement gifts. If you know what the retiree plans to do after leaving the workforce, you can tailor your gift to the retiree's hobbies or travel plans. "Subscriptions to publications, or to wine or gourmet food clubs, organization memberships, cultural events, lessons or activities in which the retiree has expressed interest, i.e. becoming more tech-savvy, learning a new language, painting, sculpting – even skydiving or rock climbing," says Rosanne Thomas, president of Protocol Advisors. "The person is retiring from work, not from life. Treat him or her to an exciting new experience."
Group retirement gifts. The most economical way to give a gift is as a group. Consider taking up a collection at the office in order to give a significant gift without busting your budget. "There is a benefit by going in as a group," says Cassie Mogilner Holmes, an associate professor of marketing at the UCLA Anderson School of Management. "Some experiences are quite costly, and a really great extraordinary experience is sort of better than the single bottle of wine you could buy by yourself." Remember to include a card or item that everyone in the office signs.
How about some thing for the ward? Craft items or washable toys for the play room. A mug set for the parents room? My daughter was admitted to a hospital in Manchester for an emergency operation to save her leg. The staff told me that a lot of the kids came with no clothes or toiletries so me and my friends clubbed together and donated 2 bin bags of various clothes, a ps2 and games and tooth brushes, tooth paste etc. Sometimes it's the basic things that mean the most xx
Shop our selection of fun, practical and inexpensive nurses week gift ideas for the special nurse who makes a difference or for your whole nursing team! Shop by appreciation theme below or scroll down for many creative recognition and appreciation gift options. Our 2018 Themes above can also be used on any imprinted product on the website Free of Charge!

The amount of money you spend a nurse’s gift has nothing to do with its value or the meaning it will have on the nurse. For example, if you had a family member in the hospital and wanted to do something nice for the nurses on the shift, picking up a box of donuts and bringing them to the nurse’s station to do wonders for the mood of the unit. Or you can do something a little more expensive and buy a unique pack of pens and give every nurse that provided care one. If you want to spend a little more, you could order some custom badge reels, stethoscope charms, maybe just a few Starbucks gift cards.
On a nurse’s busiest days they can end up walking miles and miles—give them the gift of being able to track that exercise! In such a demanding career, it can be difficult to factor in time for working out but a wearable device such as FitBit allows you to track how much activity you have actually done during the day. It also tracks your sleep and lets the nurse in your life monitor their own health data and stay motivated with their health.

What you’ll get: A collection of true stories told by different nurses in practice. The stories are in a narrative form and often feature “first” moments in practicing the nursing profession like first code, first death and many more. Helpful reflections about what keeps these nurses stay in this profession are nice to read especially if you’re doubting the career you chose.
Commemorative retirement gifts. A classic retirement gift is a watch, necklace, plaque or other object that is inscribed with the years of service to the company or in the industry. You might also consider listing noteworthy work achievements. "Gifts that are symbolic of their dedicated work and show the impact the retiree has made to the organization are appreciated," Eyring says. "A historical photo book from Shutterfly that captures their work history through photos with co-workers, articles and events. Perhaps a painting or historical print of their company."
Personalized retirement gifts. A mundane retirement gift can become special if you take the time to personalize it. Best-selling retirement gifts at Zazzle.com include T-shirts, mugs, hats, Christmas ornaments, wall clocks and golf balls that can be customized with the retiree's name, retirement date, occupation or a quote, according to Zazzle spokesperson Nicole Sargent.
Brittney Wilson, BSN, RN, a bachelors-prepared registered nurse, is the founder and owner of The Nerdy Nurse® and TheNerdyNurse.com. She is the co-founder of Health Media Academy and is an award-winning author and blogger, international keynote speaker, and influencer in the nursing and healthcare technology communities. Brittney is the author of The Nerdy Nurse's Guide to Technology and co-author of The Nurse's Guide to Blogging. She blogs about nursing, technology, health IT, at other healthcare topics at thenerdynurse.com.
Help your nurse friend achieve a healthier body by giving her a basket filled with exercise essentials, like a yoga mat and a pair of exercise gloves. You can also include DVDs and magazines to help inspire her to finally start working out if she hasn’t started yet. Don’t forget to add a water bottle. It can keep her hydrated whether she’s in the gym or hospital.
A heartfelt note. Long after the chocolate has been eaten or the experience has been enjoyed, a retiree might stumble upon the thoughtful card included with the gift. "Present the gift in person with a heartfelt written and verbalized message of thanks for the retiree's dedication, hard work and accomplishments," Thomas says. "It is appreciation and acknowledgment that people want most of all." ">
Personalized retirement gifts. A mundane retirement gift can become special if you take the time to personalize it. Best-selling retirement gifts at Zazzle.com include T-shirts, mugs, hats, Christmas ornaments, wall clocks and golf balls that can be customized with the retiree's name, retirement date, occupation or a quote, according to Zazzle spokesperson Nicole Sargent.
Long shifts, insane hours and more than difficult situations help describe the typical day for nurses in just about every department of any hospital or health care facility. National Nurses Week gives administrators a chance to let these dedicated professionals know that their heartfelt care for patients has not gone unnoticed. Honor nursing staff members at departmental parties with our all new theme decorated Nurses Week gift ideas or giveaways printed with your own sentiment and logo. ">
Nurses play an important part in many people’s lives. And that goes for family and friends, as well as for patients. The work that a nurse does is admirable, and they can always be relied on for compassion and respect. When it comes time for a nurse to retire there will be a lot of people queuing up to wish them all the best. Co-workers, current and former patients, as well as friends and family, will all want to mark the event in a special way.

Nurses in hospitals, nursing homes and medical offices throughout the country receive well-deserved praise each spring. National Nurses Week offers administrators the chance to give each member of their nursing staff a token of appreciation. Nursing Appreciation Week celebrations can include decorating the facilities with banners and balloons declaring the importance of the event. Staff, patients and visitors to the hospital or medical center will be inspired to thank their nurses throughout the week.
The bigwigs where she works are sure to be planning to mark the occasion with a medal, plaque, or some other gift that acknowledges her years of service and commitment to the profession. Friends, family and colleagues can take the opportunity to create a more personalized memory of her caring career. A few weeks before her last day speak with as many people as possible and ask them to provide a story, message, poem, drawing or sentimental memento to put in a scrapbook. If there is enough time, you could make some recordings, using a smartphone or camcorder. Interview some of her colleagues, friends, patients, and family and put them all together in a home video. When she misses her life before retirement, there will be a long lasting reminder she can replay.
With literally hundreds of hospital staff recognition gift ideas, including bags, cards, apparel, jewelry, lapel pins, and badge holders, Positive Promotions has the right product to help you celebrate National Nurses Day in a big way. Check out our selection of nurse appreciation gifts today and thank your skilled and dedicated team for whom caring comes naturally! ">
For the 2019 Nurses Appreciation Week season, we are proud to offer an expanded line of gift ideas with our all new themes that include "Proud Member of Nurses Nation" and "Nurse: Skill, Strength, Dedication". In addition to useful and heart-warming gifts, we also are offering themed decoration kits, balloons, posters, buttons and lapel pins with gift cards.

If you're looking to go the classic and traditional route it doesn't get much better than the gold pocket watch. This is a classic gift because it is supposed to symbolize the time the person has spent working. The passage of time is not only literal but figurative. If you don't want to go with the pocket watch, a standard watch or clock can also carry the same significance.


Help your nurse friend achieve a healthier body by giving her a basket filled with exercise essentials, like a yoga mat and a pair of exercise gloves. You can also include DVDs and magazines to help inspire her to finally start working out if she hasn’t started yet. Don’t forget to add a water bottle. It can keep her hydrated whether she’s in the gym or hospital.
What you’ll get: A collection of true stories told by different nurses in practice. The stories are in a narrative form and often feature “first” moments in practicing the nursing profession like first code, first death and many more. Helpful reflections about what keeps these nurses stay in this profession are nice to read especially if you’re doubting the career you chose.
Long shifts, insane hours and more than difficult situations help describe the typical day for nurses in just about every department of any hospital or health care facility. National Nurses Week gives administrators a chance to let these dedicated professionals know that their heartfelt care for patients has not gone unnoticed. Honor nursing staff members at departmental parties with our all new theme decorated Nurses Week gift ideas or giveaways printed with your own sentiment and logo.
If you're looking to go the classic and traditional route it doesn't get much better than the gold pocket watch. This is a classic gift because it is supposed to symbolize the time the person has spent working. The passage of time is not only literal but figurative. If you don't want to go with the pocket watch, a standard watch or clock can also carry the same significance.
Stethoscopes grow legs and walk away nearly every shift. Perhaps a doctor grabs it for an exam, or he leaves it in a patient’s room and it’s never seen again! If you want to splurge for a new one, the Littmann brand is generally renowned, but other ways to keep it from disappearing are with cute name charms or ID tags. The website Etsy has many retailers that feature such personalized tags. ">
Humor retirement gifts. Your retirement celebration can be enhanced with a good-natured humorous gift. Funny T-shirts and mugs are easy to come by online on sites like Etsy and Zazzle. Just be careful to avoid offending the recipient. "Remember 'gag' gifts, or any alluding to behaviors or interests that are not suitable for all audiences, are to be avoided," Thomas says. "These are funny in the moment maybe, but soon lose their charm. You do not want to be remembered for your tactless gift."
The holidays are coming! Chances are you need a gift idea for a colleague or work gift exchange, or there’s a special nurse in your life who needs a treat! Below are my holiday gift ideas for nurses. Whether it’s for a sister, friend, or colleague, the nurse in your life deserves something special! Here’s what may be on his or her wish list this year.
Hi! One of my favorite gifts--for someone I have not already gifted with this--is to make a rice bag. You can take either a nice hand towel, or some inexpensive polar fleece (I usually use the fleece) and sew a square packet, then fill it with rice, and sew it shut. With the fleece, I then take a pair of scissors and fringe the edges for a nice look. ">
Consider championing a proactive approach at your facility to clearly communicate that staff are not allowed to receive monetary gifts or the equivalent. Create a statement—e.g., “It is our policy that staff may not accept gifts of any kind”— that can be shared with new patients in their information packet about the facility, parking, visitors, etc, and suggest alternatives for redirecting gifts.
×