A busy nurse won’t have had much time for new experiences. So give her a gift that brings plenty of them. She may not yet have any definite plans for her retirement, so introduce her to some possible options. Would she relish the chance to learn to fly? Does she long to become a salsa dancer? Does travel to an exotic country feature in her future plans? Sign her up for some foreign language classes. Retirement is also going to bring her plenty of time to enjoy leisurely lunches, so buy her some gift coupons for her favorite restaurants or coffee shops. ">
Nurse gift throw blanket that can be personalized with name, date, medical facility or years of service. A keepsake gift for Nurse graduation gift, school nurse gift, registered nurse gift, nurse thank you gift, Nurse's Day and nurse retirement gift. Unique gift for nurse week celebration, achievement, and years of service for those in the medical field.

Stethoscopes grow legs and walk away nearly every shift. Perhaps a doctor grabs it for an exam, or he leaves it in a patient’s room and it’s never seen again! If you want to splurge for a new one, the Littmann brand is generally renowned, but other ways to keep it from disappearing are with cute name charms or ID tags. The website Etsy has many retailers that feature such personalized tags. ">
It’s gift-giving season again—although for oncology nurses, managing material expressions of gratitude happens all year long, not just during the holidays. This can be a complex issue for all healthcare providers but especially oncology nurses, who develop a special, unique bond with patients and their families, who often want to show tangible appreciation for their care.
Hi! One of my favorite gifts--for someone I have not already gifted with this--is to make a rice bag. You can take either a nice hand towel, or some inexpensive polar fleece (I usually use the fleece) and sew a square packet, then fill it with rice, and sew it shut. With the fleece, I then take a pair of scissors and fringe the edges for a nice look.

Good quality, fits perfect on the Pandora bracelet. Some reviews said it was cheap looking however I disagree. My pandora is all pandora charms except for this one, and you can't even tell this difference. Delivery was quick. Just have to wait and see what the durability is like and how long it last before fading or losing stones as mentioned in other reviews.
It’s an honor to be a preceptor. I love taking a new nurse, or a student nurse, under my wing and teaching them the ropes of nursing. And while I find great joy in teaching, I also find it incredibly stressful. Not that the new nurse isn’t smart, they are. It’s just a stressful job, and it’s very fast-paced, which means that it’s easy to fall behind and it’s easy to miss something. I have a routine, one I know that works well for me and my patients and keeps me in check throughout the day. If I have to hand over some of the responsibility to a newbie, or slow my pace down to explain something, it’s much easier to overlook something important, or fall behind and have to stay at work charting until 9pm. Not to mention, it’s my license that is on the line.
If you’re someone that has been interested in buying your favorite nurse a stethoscope, but don’t know which one they’d like this stethoscope makes for a very thoughtful gift that any nurse is sure to appreciate whether they’re a graduate nursing student, just starting out in their career or are simply in need of a new stethoscope, but haven’t had a chance to get one.
Experience retirement gifts. Retirees already have a lifetime of accumulated possessions, but almost everyone appreciates a fun new experience. "The research suggests that experiential gifts are better than material gifts," Galak says. "That is, rather than give a gold watch, give a ticket to a concert. Even better would be to give two tickets, and go with the recipient. Not only will the retiree appreciate the experience itself, but they will have a chance to form a stronger bond with the gift giver." ">
Do you have a favorite nurse that will soon be retiring? Is there a family member that will soon be ending her nursing career? Do you have a favorite co-worker who will be retiring in the very near future? After a lengthy career, this person will be looking forward to retirement, and you want to give her a gift that has meaning and value. And you most definitely don’t want it to be the kind of gift that spends its life sat at the back of a drawer.
Hi! One of my favorite gifts--for someone I have not already gifted with this--is to make a rice bag. You can take either a nice hand towel, or some inexpensive polar fleece (I usually use the fleece) and sew a square packet, then fill it with rice, and sew it shut. With the fleece, I then take a pair of scissors and fringe the edges for a nice look.
The nurse that is charged with overseeing the staff has had his or her share of late nights, getting called-in at the last minute, and just about every other means of interrupted sleep you could possibly imagine.  This Philips Wake-Up light may not help with an ongoing staffing shortage, but it will help you feel more rested and ready to face it when you do get called-in. This gentle alarm clock is clinically-proven to work like the sunrise, rousing you naturally form your slumber with 10 gradually-increasing brightness settings, a gentle beep, and even a snooze option. No sudden harsh alarms, no disorienting music blasting, just that nice, gentle feeling of awakening gradually that your boss so richly deserves.

If you know they have a birthday, graduation, retirement, holiday or you share a professional relationship (in this case a traditional/common gift may be appropriate) such as a teacher/nursing instrucor or a labor/delivery nurse and you want to give them a good gift plan early and save yourself both the time and stress that comes with last minute shopping/gift giving.

While her nursing career might not have left much free time for hobbies and other interests, a new retiree will have all the time in the world to cultivate her interests or maybe explore a new hobby. You could create a gift basket filled with hobby related items. For example, say she’s a gardener, fill a watering can with various gardening tools and equipment and throw in a few packets of seeds. If she’s a whizz in the kitchen, then some cookery books, kitchen gadgets, oven gloves, apron, tasty ingredients will be more suitable. And if you know there’s something she’s been dying to learn, then enrol her in some lessons.


And we could go on, but you should get the idea. Leading up to the day of her retirement when you can give her a bouquet of twelve red roses. Add a note containing a message, favorite quote, or special words, with each of the gifts, and keep your identity secret until the last day. Alternatively, all her co-workers could take it in turns providing a range of different gifts. One for each day leading up to her last day at work.
Nurses, what’s sometimes more exciting and touching than store bought gifts? It’s DIY nurse gifts, of course. When somebody takes their precious time and effort to make something for you, then you can’t help but treasure it. I personally like to throw things out and de-clutter but when it comes to presents that people have made especially for me, I happily reminisce for a beat and then tuck them into a special spot.

Some people may think gift cards are a “lazy option”, but I think they’re just fabulous. Does your preceptor enjoy reading? What about a magazine subscription? Or better yet…a nursing magazine subscription! Nurses need to stay up-to-date with healthcare trends, and the magazines that are out there now are really enjoyable to read as well as informative. Or, you could get him/her a gift card to the local scrub shop (we always need new scrubs…those things take a beating!).
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